Nutrition

The Importance of Pre and Post Exercise Nutrition

Here at 50/50, our members take their exercise seriously. Between spin classes, bootcamp-style group fitness, strength training, and training for 5Ks and triathlons, our members definitely know how to stay active. However, how often do you stop and think about how you are fueling these workouts? Are you getting adequate pre- and post-workout nutrition? Are you eating enough calories to sustain your energy through your weekly workouts?

First, with nutrition as with exercise, it’s important to have a clear goal in mind. If you’re looking to lose weight, you must be in a caloric deficit, meaning you are burning more calories than you’re consuming. However, it’s important that this caloric deficit isn’t too large, or it will have negative impacts on your energy levels, training results, recovery, and metabolism. If you’re trying to build lean muscle or gain overall size, you need to be in a caloric surplus. If your goal is to lose body fat while building muscle, eating at a maintenance calorie level while adjusting your protein, fat, and carb levels can help you attain this goal. If you’re training for a marathon or other endurance event, it is imperative that you take in enough calories, particularly carbohydrates, to fuel your long training runs. The moral of the story – the outcome goal matters.

It’s also very important to eat the right foods before and after your workouts to maximize your results. How many times have you had a workout that didn’t quite feel like your best effort? Maybe you felt a little lightheaded or sluggish, or maybe you experienced muscle cramps during the workout. Your nutrition plays a huge role in all of these! It’s important to ingest a small meal or snack 1-2 hours before your workout to ensure you have enough energy to complete the workout. You should eat something that will sustain your energy, improve your performance, help you recover quickly, and hydrate your body. Signs that you haven’t had enough to eat before your workout include lightheadedness, dizziness, and slow recovery. Eating protein in the few hours prior to your workout will boost your muscle-building capabilities, help you recover faster from workouts, and provide sustained energy. Ingesting carbs before a workout, such as a piece of fruit, will enhance your energy, particularly for high-intensity or longer endurance-type workouts.

Finally, what you eat post-workout also plays a huge role in your ability to recover and bounce back for your next workout session. It is also important in achieving the goals you set out to accomplish during your training sessions. Post-workout nutrition should help you rehydrate, recover and refuel, build muscle, and improve your future performance. Most importantly, eat a meal high in protein right after exercise to prevent the breakdown of proteins in your bloodstream and stimulate protein synthesis, which leads to increases in muscle tissue. Eating protein post-workout will also help alleviate some of the delayed-onset muscle soreness (or DOMS) that you may feel after a particularly challenging workout. Second, your body tolerates and processes carbohydrates most efficiently in the 3-hour window post-workout, so this is your best window to eat your starchier carbs. Eating carbs after exercise will replenish your glycogen stores, which have been spent during your workout, and will also improve your ability to bounce back and come back stronger for your next workout. And last but not least, staying hydrated and drinking sufficient water before, during, and after all your workouts is one of the most important steps you can take to properly fuel your body and achieve the results you’re looking for.

Real Results Start with Consistency

Real Results Start with Consistency 

Health and Fitness Specialist, Emily Mailloux

You’ve probably heard the saying, “you can’t out work a bad diet.” Here at 50/50, we have a wide array of group fitness classes, strength classes, personal training, and opportunities to be active out in the community. Unfortunately, even if you’re taking full advantage of these options every week, if your diet isn’t where it should be, you may be struggling to see the results you hope for. While exercise is important for many reasons, most body composition changes don’t occur until you start to make lasting changes to your nutrition. It’s a crucial piece of your overall health and wellness, and one of our most important focal points here at 50/50. Here’s how to approach a healthy diet that will support your exercise routine without driving yourself crazy.

First, prioritize protein. Make sure that you’re getting protein with every meal. Healthy protein sources include poultry, fish, lean beef and pork, eggs, beans, and dairy sources such as cottage cheese, greek yogurt, and milk. For a handy reference guide, look no further than your own hand. Men should aim to have two palm-sized portions of protein at each meal, and women should have at least one palm-sized portion per meal.

Next, add your vegetables. US dietary guidelines recommend that you fill half your plate at each meal with vegetables or fruits. Try to get a wide variety of vegetables each day – dark leafy greens such as kale or spinach, starchy vegetables such as sweet potatoes and squash, and red and orange vegetables including carrots, tomatoes, and peppers. Be creative with your veggie choices! Sauteed spinach, mushrooms, and onions go great in an omelette or with your morning eggs. Add lettuce, tomato, or sprouts to your sandwich at lunch, or have a big salad with lots of different veggies and protein on top. For dinner, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and cauliflower roasted with olive oil and a little salt and pepper are a great addition to any meal.

The US dietary guidelines also recommend that half of your daily grains come from whole grains. Whole grains are present in either their whole form or are ground into a flour, without losing any part of the seed. These grains are higher in fiber, potassium, iron, B vitamins, and other important nutrients than refined grains, which have finer texture and longer shelf life. Some of the best sources of whole grains that should be a part of your daily diet include brown rice, barley, buckwheat, bulgur, oatmeal, and whole wheat breads. When shopping, be sure to look for whole-grain breads, cereals, or crackers instead of refined grain options. Try cooking barley, bulgur, or brown rice with your protein and vegetables for a balanced dinner, have oatmeal, bulgur pancakes, or whole-grain toast for breakfast, and use whole-wheat bread or wraps for your sandwiches at lunch.

Finally, getting an adequate amount of healthy fats in your daily diet is an important part of balanced eating. Between 25-40% of your daily calories should come from healthy fats such as avocados, olives, nuts, seeds, nut butters, coconuts, and oils. Some of these fat sources will also come from animal sources, such as the fats found in dairy products, eggs, fish, and meats. Avocados or almond butter on whole grain toast make great breakfast options, add sunflower seeds or olives to your salads, snack on raw almonds or walnuts, and cook with olive or coconut oils whenever possible. Eating healthy fats will help you feel more satiated, provide energy, protect your organs, and help your body burn stored body fat.

Last but not least, drink your water! Maintaining an adequate level of hydration throughout the day is crucial for your organ health, immune system, energy levels, and fat-burning, among many other benefits. To get started, drink a minimum of ½ an ounce of water for every pound of body weight, and add 12 ounces for every 30 minutes you spend working out. Gradually work on adding more water throughout the day until you are closer to one ounce per pound of body weight.

Not all fat is created equal

Personal Training Director, Jay McWilliams

We continue on with our discussion of body composition this week with an important but often overlooked subject: the difference between visceral and subcutaneous fat. Everybody has both, but the distribution of fat in your body has serious health implications. Previously when we talked about body composition, we kept things pretty simple: we left it at body fat percentage and lean mass percentage (everything else). But for two people with the exact same body fat percentage and weight, there can be important differences in where the fat is stored.
Subcutaneous fat lies below the skin and above the muscle. This fat is less detrimental to your health (although it may be covering up those six pack abs you’ve been working so hard for). In fact, appropriate levels of subcutaneous fat have been shown to reduce the risk of broken bones in the elderly, simply by providing a cushioning effect. So, remember, leaner isn’t always better after a point. The more sinister fat we all have is visceral fat. Visceral fat resides in the abdomen, surrounding our internal organs, and even invading the tissue of our liver. Visceral fat has more profound metabolic effects on the body than subcutaneous fat, and is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Some people with dangerously high levels of visceral fat are by no means overweight, but the excess fat in the “belly” increases their risk of heart disease.
How do I know if I have too much visceral fat? One simple way to screen for excess visceral fat is a waist to hip ratio. Simply measure your waist just above the navel and your hips at the widest point. The ratio of these two numbers (waist/hip) should be less than 0.9 for women and less than 1 for men. People with a more “pear-shaped” weight distribution are at significantly lower risk of heart disease even if they are overweight. The good news for all of us is that exercise tends to target visceral fat first. So your morning spin class and your evening Tabata are doing an essential job at reducing the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease, even if you don’t see the numbers on the scale moving at first.
Keep up the good work people!

How do you feel about food?

Well Cardio month sure went by in a heartbeat, and now it is time for nutrition month here at 50/50. If you look to the internet, the media, or even ask your friends and loved ones you will get wildly different opinions on what constitutes a “healthy diet”.  The subject of nutrition is one of the most controversial and most emotional dinner table conversations, rivaling both politics and religion. Many of us are always looking for the “best diet”. I have news for all of you, there is no one “best diet”. There are many different eating strategies that will meet your nutritional needs and help you reach your goals, be it increasing muscle mass, decreasing body fat, or maintaining your healthy weight. In fact, recent research has found that one of the reasons many “diet plans” are effective is that they result in people being more mindful of their food choices. In some cases, the mindful eating effect may be more important than the particular requirements of the diet.

This week I want you all to focus on how your food choices make you feel. There is no right or wrong. Try to avoid thinking about “eating clean” or “good food versus bad food”, simply observe your choices and your body’s feedback. For example, I have recently cut way back on sugar and have noticed that my energy level and mood are more stable. My Starbucks mocha habit was having a negative effect on my day and my wallet, and to be honest I haven’t been missing them since cutting them out. Simple observations like these can really make a big difference in our daily habits. If remove some of the judgement from our food decisions, we are more open to really noticing how our bodies respond to various foods and tailoring our diet so we feel our best. Some of us feel our best eating eggs and bacon for breakfast and others feel best with a plant-based diet, neither is inherently right or wrong and both can be done successfully. If you feel really inspired, maybe even keep a food journal this week, no, not calorie counting, just an account of what you ate and how you feel. This simple step will result in more mindful eating and most likely better nutrition.

70 Classes?!

With 70 group exercise classes on the schedule, and 9 amazing health and fitness specialists, we have everything you need to reach your true potential. Need some added attention, accountability, and a structured plan inside the gym and out? Give personal training or small group training a try! With so many options, so many avenues, and decisions to make each and every day – why not set up a complimentary consultation? Katie, Jay, Jamie, and Justin are available to meet and mentor you on all of those little decisions you’re forced to come by. They do matter and we’re here to help!

So take advantage and sign-up for your consultation today!

Click to schedule

Inside Katie’s Kitchen

Many times, people will ask us what we eat during the day to get an idea of foods that might be healthy for them. Verging slightly from my regular routine of Katie’s Corner, I thought I would bring to you one of the most vulnerable parts of my house-my kitchen! So I sifted through items in my own refrigerator and pantry and am presenting them to you here in hopes that you are able to get an idea of items that might be great for you to eat for meals and snacks. This is not intended to be a guideline for your own diet, but I do think it’s helpful to get an inside view of someone else’s kitchen. I’ve made notes here and there, but if you have specific questions, please reach out to me in the studio or by emailing me at katie@energiastudios.com.

Staples:
Ziploc or Tupperware Storage Containers in various sizes
Olive Oil
Spices
Mozzarella Cheese
Goat Cheese- I like cheese.
Sliced Almonds
Spicy Mustard
Real Maple Syrup- I’m from the South, so I feel the need to clarify the “real” part.

Most of these items you’ll want to use sparingly, as they can be high in calories, but they can provide bursts of flavor even when used sparingly. Healthy food does not equal bland food!Items that you don’t want to use sparingly in this list, however, are the storage containers. Plan your meals in advance and portion them into these, so that you have grab-and-go options for lunches or snacks during the day. I cannot stress this point enough-planning and preparing your meals in advance are the keys to staying on track and in your ultimate success. You will spend less time planning and prepping your meals in advance than if you wing every meal.

Breakfast:
Berries
Fage 0% or 2% Greek Yogurt
Go Lean Crunch

This breakfast combination is what I have most every day for breakfast. I can carry it with me to the studio when I have an early-morning training and not feel like I have to wolf down my breakfast before I leave for the day. When I have more time and am feeling a little fancy, I will have two of the three proteins listed below with half an avocado and salsa. And pepper. Lots of freshly cracked pepper.Smoked Salmon
Eggs
Lentils
Avocados
Salsa
Lunch:
Lentil or Split Pea Soup
Egg White Salad prepared with Greek Yogurt and Mustard
Curried Chicken Salad with Greek Yogurt, Curry powder, Halved Grapes, Sliced Almonds, Cracked pepper
Wheatberry Salad
Loaded Sweet Potato
Many of these things, I get pre-prepared at my grocery store of choice, Trader Joe’s, though sometimes, I will make lunches ahead of time, i.e. the Curried Chicken Salad. I cook the sweet potato in advance and will load it with any combination of chicken breast, cheese, avocado, black beans, or sautéed veggies.
Dinner:
Chicken Breast
SalmonBrussels Sprouts
Heirloom or Cherry Tomatoes
Spinach
Mushrooms
Beets
Quinoa
Quinoa and Brown Rice Pasta
Black Beans
Chick PeasI make the side items in bulk at the beginning of the week and portion them into those storage containers I have been speaking so highly about. That way, I can pop home, cook my protein and heat up the sides in the meantime. And I have a healthy, nourishing meal to eat at the end of a long day.
Frozen Staples:
Turkey and Bison Burgers
Mixed VeggiesSnacks:
Hummus
Cauliflower, Carrots, and Broccoli
KIND Bars
Almond Butter
Apple/Pear
Air-popped PopcornSnacks are such a necessary thing to prepare in advance, and again, grab-and-go options are essential so that you don’t find yourself at the vending machine in the middle of the day.

Desserts:
Dark Chocolate
Greek Yogurt Sorbet with a teaspoon of honey

Yes, I eat desserts! Just in moderation.
Drinks:
Unsweetened Vanilla Almond Milk
This is a low-calorie option for something other than water.
Your challenge this week: Plan, prepare, and portion your meals ahead of time, and ask us for help if you need it!

Quick Guide to the Nutrition Label

1) Serving Size: Start from the top! Serving size is where the main deception lies. Something may appear to be worthwhile when in reality, you are eating multiple servings. Always multiply all nutrient values by the total number of servings you are consuming. A serving is typically much less than you’d think!

2) Calories: Total calories are important. If something is excessive, you’ll know it right away. Your body can only handle and break down so much at once. An overload could lead to fat storage. Keep meals small and often, not large and sparse.

3) Fat: There are good types of fat (essential fats) and bad types of fats. Saturated fats and trans fats can lead to weight gain, clogged arteries and, increased LDL (poor cholesterol). At a whopping 9 calories per gram, it’s important to limit excess consumption. As a general rule, we rarely recommend more than 15 grams for a meal and 5-7 for a snack.

4) Fiber: Fiber is one of the most important nutrients. Fiber helps to eliminate toxins, increase digestibility, and keep you full longer. Aim high. >25 grams for women, >35 grams for men.

5) Sugar: Here’s a task. See how many foods you can find that are higher in fiber than they are in sugar. Not many. Nowadays, almost everything is full of high fructose corn syrup. It’s in our breads, our cereals, our meats, everything. Be careful! There is no use or need for excess sugar.

6) Sodium: Sodium is packed into sauces, canned goods, deli meats, and snacks. It’s everywhere. More often than not, it’s used as a food additive to aid in preservation. You’ll find that your sodium levels will drop off if you start eating natural foods. Low sodium reduces your chances for high blood pressure.

7) Vitamins and Minerals: Always try and get the majority of your vitamins and minerals from food sources. Fruits and veges are your best bet!

8) Chemicals: If you can’t pronounce it, don’t eat it. If a simple product is loaded with ingredients, why take the risk? Processed foods are mechanically or chemically altered. Enriched, fortified, hydrogenated, bleached, and bromated all mean that the original source was tampered with.

NEW YEAR, NEW YOU!

If you’re like most people, the holidays are a time of mixed emotions. You’re excited and anxious to spend time with family, and you’re dreading the extra weight that you know you’re bound to gain. Are these holiday pounds inevitable?

Lean in close to catch these seven secret ways to help you fend off extra weight through the holidays. And once you’re done, don’t keep it a secret. Go tell somebody!

Holiday Secret #1: Listen to Your Body

It may not speak quickly enough all the time, but you know your body is constantly telling you things. Sometimes it tells you to stop a certain activity before you get hurt. During the holiday season, it tells you to put the brakes on your eating before you go beyond the point of no return. When your body tells you it’s full, listen up! A single bite after you’re full will lead to extra calories and eventually, extra pounds.

Holiday Secret #2: Confine the Holidays

For some, holidays become weeks and even months of poor eating. Be careful to avoid this pitfall by digging into your holiday foods only on the actual holiday. Treat the other days like normal days—even if you’re off of work. And when the holiday is over, let someone else take the leftovers home and go to your own house without any pudding or gravy in tow.

Holiday Secret #3: Eat First, Party Second

You read right—it’s good to eat before heading out the door. Have a healthy, well-rounded meal at home with fruits, vegetables, and your protein source of choice. And drink a tall glass of water. Why? So when you get to that holiday party that is overflowing with cookies, cakes, candies, and calories, you’re not hungry for it. Your stomach is full of healthy goodness and has no room for the fattening stuff.

Holiday Secret #4: Plan Your Escape

Getting away from food isn’t easy. If you expect to be able to walk away from delicious thigh- and gut-growing foods without any forethought, think again. Before walking into a potentially fattening situation, plan out what you’re going to eat and take your own dish to share if necessary. Any time there is a particularly difficult eating situation, make plans an hour or so after the dangerous-to-your-diet event begins and excuse yourself.

Holiday Secret #5: Exercise Everywhere

One of the best excuses to gain weight is that you have to travel to visit family and don’t have access to your personal trainer. Well, guess what? Just because your trainer isn’t staying in the hotel with you doesn’t mean you aren’t accountable! Scope out the area where you’ll be traveling and take advantage of whatever exercise opportunities are available. There may be a gym or pool at your hotel, a pay-as-you-go gym, or a nice park nearby where you can walk or run with or without family members.

Holiday Secret #6: Pay Attention to People

Holidays are about family and friends…right? Then stop focusing on food! When you go to a party, there is no need to hang out by the food table when there are people all around you! Ignore the grub and go for the meaningful stuff that you’ll remember and cherish. Besides, it’s much easier to talk without munching and you even listen better when you’re not stuck thinking about how good the next bite is going to be.

Holiday Secret #7: Drink Instead

No, this isn’t a license to drink as much alcohol as you can find. Doing that will add lots of useless calories to your waistline. Instead, do your best to make friends with a glass of water everywhere you go. As you mingle with your water glass, you’ll find it challenging to grab more than a couple of finger foods here and there, and the fact that it is water will help you remember to watch what else goes in your mouth!

Wouldn’t you love to make 2016 the year that you transform your body?

Wouldn’t it feel great to throw out all of your fat clothes? To look forward to bathing suit season? To be given a clean bill of health from your doctor? And to be showered with compliments by family, friends and that special someone?

It’s all more possible than you think.

But you’ll need to take massive action.

REGISTER FOR THE NEW YEAR, NEW YOU CHALLENGE

Go on, do it now and secure your spot before the New Year’s rush.

Top Tips for a Successful and Healthy Holiday Season

By: Marit Harney RD, LDN, CPT

Everyone is aware of the fact that eating and exercise habits tend to decline around the holidays, leaving most of us 2-5 pounds heavier by the time we hit January.  Many of us fail to lose all the weight and continue to slowly pack on the pounds year after year.  I’m sure you’re also aware of the many reasons WHY this happens to so many people, but maybe you didn’t connect the dots on all the factors that contribute to this unwanted behavior change. Below I have listed some of the most common factors for overeating or binge eating around the Holidays.

  • Family drama increases emotional stress                                                 download
  • Over committed schedule increases physical and emotional stress
  • Treats are flowing off every table you look at! Willpower is a finite power. The more you call upon it, the weaker you get.
  • Social acceptability or feeling obligated to eat or drink certain things. Maybe it’s time to create a new “norm” for yourself. After all, you deserve to be supported by those around you who care.

I have a proposition for you:

Let’s do things a little (and I mean a little, if that’s what’s do-able) different this year to minimize the damage

I’m phrasing it this way, because it’s realistic and cumulative in terms of beneficial effects. Year after year, if you do things just a little better/ different, you can slow or avoid the steady creeping weight.  What you won’t be doing is thinking that you will “stick to your healthy diet through the holidays and workout every day.” That’s not going to happen. Let’s get real!

Here are some practical tips to help you navigate positive changes during the holiday season. Take a look and consider doing the ones that seem the easiest this year. This does not mean do all the things on the list! You may also consider which of these changes may have the greatest impact on your habits, and start with that one thing. Once you have identified the thing(s) that you plan to work on, write it/them down.  I encourage you to also write your plans in the comments section below this article. This will

Help create a sense of community, support and accountability with others like you! 

  1. Load your plate up with the good stuff like veggies and meat.
    • Leave a little room for indulgences that your wouldn’t normally have. Moderation > deprivation.
  2. Get rid of junky leftovers ASAP
    • Either avoid having them by sending them with someone else, or give them away. Honestly, I don’t feel bad about throwing away food that will sabotage me or others. Don’t pawn off your problem foods onto someone else who might be struggling with willpower.
  3. Consistently eat a solid breakfast
    • This will set your mind and metabolism up for success for the day. I suggest a smoothie with a clean protein powder, almond or coconut milk, spinach, berries and ground flax. Eggs and veggies are always a good option as well.
  4. Sprinkle in exercise and make reasonable goals
    • Plan your exercise time for when you actually might have some time (wknds or days off) and get it done first thing in the AM. On the other days, aim to move your body as much or as often as you can. That might mean walking for 15 mins, doing 20-50 jumping jacks, squats, pushups or planks whenever you have a free moment. Exercise does not need to be done all at once. Fit in a little here and a little there, on your busy days.
  5. Practice yoga for 15 mins per day or do some form of stress management
    • Adding this practice into your daily routine can help you cope with stress, leaving you less reliant on treats and alcohol. This WEBSITE provides free multi level and time frame yoga classes that you can do at home! Also check out the Headspace App on your phone for a free 10 day for 10 minutes, guided meditation program.
  6. Drink lots of water
    • Properly hydrating will help regulate your appetite, give you more energy, and keep your metabolism humming along.
  7. Limit treats on days when you don’t have a party or “eating commitment”
    • Save your treats for when it matters at get-togethers.
  8. Bring a dish
    • Bring a healthy (or healthier) option that you and others can enjoy so you aren’t deprived
  9. Limit your use of willpower when possible
    •  Evaluate temping situations and decide if avoiding it is possible or reasonable. Save your willpower for when there is no avoiding a situation.
  10. Play up the non- alcoholic beverages
    • Ask for seltzer, a splash of juice (optional) and some lemon or lime in a glass with a straw. No one will know you’re not drinking a mixed drink. At a sit down dinner? Just say alcoholic drinks give you heart burn.
  11. Choose your treat if you’re having one
    • Either one alcoholic drink or one dessert. Choose red wine when possible.
  12. Recognize your trigger foods and avoid completely
    • It will make things easier later, if you make this one decision now.
  13. Make your goal to eat mindfully, not complete avoidance or deprivation
  14. Don’t beat yourself up when you don’t meet your expectation 100%
    • Learn from your mistakes and move on. Harping on it will not change a thing! Let it go-

So what things will YOU be working on this year? I want to see them written below!

MaritHarney.Com

15 Quick Tips to Streamline your Results…

If you’re on a mission to tone up and stay strong through the Holiday season, then it’s really important to try and hone your fat loss and minimize potential fat storage. And we all know, there’s a whole lot of “potential” lurking around us. Losing pounds feels good, but if those pounds are precious muscle, then you’re actually hurting your overall ability to achieve your desired results. In order to maximize healthy weight loss, let’s try and manage our calories more effectively, to avoid those massive ebbs and flows that inevitably come around this time of year.

Weight Management Tip #1: Keep Track

Your willingness to track your food intake is equal to your desire to lose weight. Being serious about losing weight means taking note of every meal you consume, making sure these calories contain enough protein, and stopping when you meet your daily allowance.

Weight Management Tip #2: Always Eat Breakfast

Possibly the most fundamental eating tip of all time, a healthy breakfast with a good protein source will help your body utilize good calories throughout the a.m. hours, letting you get to lunch without being tempted by that mid-morning office treat.

Weight Management Tip #3: Avoid Getting Too Hungry

Dieters often fast until they can’t take it any longer. Unfortunately, many poor choices are made in the heat of the hunger moment. Keep healthy (high protein and low carb) snacks nearby to stave off hunger and drink plenty of water to avoid eating when you should be drinking.

Weight Management Tip #4: Underestimate Your Routine

Yes, you just worked your butt off in the gym for an hour… But you probably didn’t burn as many calories as you think. To keep from overeating immediately after a workout, grab a bite within 30 minutes, but make it a small bite. And drink plenty of water. Then wait. Your brain needs time to tell your body it’s full.

Weight Management Tip #5: Stay Home

Your favorite restaurant may be calling your name, but don’t listen! By cooking your own dinner at home, you’ll sidestep a variety of pitfalls that occur while eating out.

Weight Management Tip #6: Reduce Alcohol Intake

It helps you relax and—if you drink red wine—can offer health benefits. But alcohol also comes with a lot of useless calories. To avoid having more calories to burn than necessary, skip the bar and grab another glass of water. You can notice the theme here! Most people do not drink nearly enough water this time of year, because it’s not hot. Our bodies still need that consistent intake, regardless.

Weight Management Tip #7: Redirect

Sticking with any sort of plan gets hard, even one as simple as this. The next time it gets unbearable, grab your phone and walk out of the danger zone (your kitchen) and call a friend or loved one. Ask how life is going or plan a movie night—just talk about whatever will take your mind off that temptation that will ultimately ruin your efforts.

Weight Management Tip #8: Hit the Hay

Remember when your parents gave you a curfew because “Nothing good happens after midnight”? Well, it still applies. Get to bed to avoid late-night snacking and help your body function its best!

Weight Management Tip #9: Go Green (First)

There are lots of good foods out there that you need—lean meats, dairy, etc. But don’t let these be the bulk of your diet. Start your meals with something healthy and green to keep your carb count low, and belly full.

Weight Management Tip #10: Weigh Yourself

You might not like the idea of jumping on the scale, but if you don’t weigh yourself, you may not recognize your progress. Just as you should keep an eye on your calories, you should also count your pounds and make adjustments to your eating and exercise routines as needed, based on how your body responds. Listen to it!

Weight Management Tip #11: Disconnect Diet from Life

Life, in general, comes with those ups and downs. Your diet should not. When stressed, don’t go to the vending machine. Put on your walking shoes and get going.

Weight Management Tip #12: Keep the Burn Going

Working out is not supposed to be a walk in the park. To push your body to its true potential and to burn more calories, don’t take long breaks between lower weight and body weight exercises. Rest no more than 30 seconds after each exercise to keep your heart rate up.

Weight Management Tip #13: Goodbye Sugary Sweet

Everyone needs a quick sweet on occasion. Make sure yours is natural, whole fruit rather than regular old sugar. Every day, it seems more research is showing that refined sugars and high-fructose corn syrup increase your likelihood of weight gain more than anything else.

Weight Management Tip #14: Move Now!

Maintaining a consistent, challenging exercise program is essential for your overall health and well-being, but don’t let that be your only exercise. Build 15-minute windows throughout your day during which you can take a brisk walk, stretch, or just generally move around a bit. You’ll be more alert at work, energetic, and motivated.

Weight Management Tip #15: Don’t Give Up

You may think it’s too easy a tip to list, but very few people have the will power necessary to keep with a program long enough to see the desired results. Commit yourself today to being one of those few. If you’re not yet a personal training client, it may be the perfect time to really experience the difference when you decide to finally put yourself first.

Close