Tagged as: core

Something to Think About, and then Do – Moving

Written by Susan Brano

Something to Think About, and then Do is a series of articles to inform you about training and exercise concepts and to provide ways of bringing them into your daily life. So far, you’ve read about core, posture, glute amnesia, cardio fitness, hydration and balance. Our seventh installment is about Moving.

You just finished your 45 minute workout at 5050 and you feel pretty good. You waved your arms and legs around, lifted some weights, did a few moves on the TRX, and stretched. Phew! You’re all set now until your next session in a day or 2, right? Yes and no.

Taking classes and/or working with a personal trainer provide an excellent foundation for a strong, healthy life. They also provide inspiration for wanting to continue. After your workout at 5050, you’ve earned time to relax, read a book, watch a little TV. But you also want to build on that excellent foundation by moving. There is a misconception that for movement to be beneficial, it needs to be ‘exercise’. If you do push-ups or sit-ups or the like at home, that’s great and you should continue to do so. If you don’t, don’t fret. The important thing is to move. That’s what our muscles are made for and that’s what will keep us healthy and strong.

 

There are many things you can do throughout that day for your muscles. Here are some suggestions: if you’re sitting, move from sitting to standing a few times, maybe do a few squats, swing your legs and arms, roll your neck; take a walk, varying the speed (fast-slowfast-slow); play catch with a person or a pet. Gardening is good, bending up and down (with good form), grabbing and pulling weeds. Yard work of all types: mowing the lawn (with a push mower), moving rocks around (back straight, core engaged), trimming bushes. You can always put on some music and dance! Lastly, a few stretches: reach up to the ceiling on flat feet and on your toes, reach down to the floor, reach up and over from side to side, repeat.

Movement is good for your muscles and joints, and good for your soul. I’ve heard so many times how good clients feel after moving, which is good for my soul.

Enjoy

The Importance of Balance Training

The Importance of Balance Training

Written by Personal Training Director, Jay McWilliams

The Two types of Balance

Here at 50/50, April is all about balance… you know a balance of snow showers and spring flowers. Just kidding! Crazy weather aside, we are taking this month to focus on keeping our bodies in balance. While balance is one of our key focal points for a balanced approach to health and wellness, it can be easily overlooked. I want to take some time to discuss why balance is important, and how we can improve our balance. The importance of balance training is paramount.  Two types of balance are essential for achieving functional balance: static and dynamic balance. Static balance refers to the ability to maintain your body in a set position, while dynamic balance describes the ability to remain in control of the body during changing circumstances, utilizing movements to maintain a base of support. Picture static balance as simply standing on one foot, while dynamic balance is surfing on a surf board. Both require proprioception, the ability to know where your body is in space, and strength. Focusing on improving proprioception and strength, particularly core strength, will improve your balance. This becomes increasingly important as we age, as falls due to lack of balance are a common cause of serious injury.

Proprioception Training

Proprioception requires the integration of input from our visual, sensory, and vestibular systems. Working on agility and coordination are great ways to improve your proprioceptive abilities. I encourage you to try a new class that pushes you slightly outside your comfort zone to do this. Great options for improving proprioception are Step and Core or Cardio Kick Boxing. The choreography and movements are fun and challenge your proprioception constantly. Secondly, and just as important is developing strength. As I have stated before, a well-rounded training program includes at least 2-3 days of a full-body strength training routine. Personal training and Targeted training ensure you are receiving this full-body strength programming in a safe and effective way. Pilates and Yoga are also great ways to improve core strength, and will also challenge your balance in other ways. Note, that while Bosu trainers and unstable platforms can be incorporated into a routine, training on these surfaces does not have to be a key part of improving your balance.

I encourage you all to mix up your routine this month.

Challenge your body in new and unexpected ways. Your balance will improve and your future self will thank you!

Do you have enough balance in your life? From cardio to strength to flexibility, nutrition, and everything in between – we’ve got you covered at 50/50. Come on in and speak to a specialist, to get your health and wellness back on track!

Click here to Learn about and Claim your Complimentary Health and Wellness Consult!
http://5050fitnessnutrition.com/functional-fitness/joint-by-joint-approach/

Click here to read our article on The Joint by Joint Approach!

 

 

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