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The Importance of Balance Training

The Importance of Balance Training

Written by Personal Training Director, Jay McWilliams

The Two types of Balance

Here at 50/50, April is all about balance… you know a balance of snow showers and spring flowers. Just kidding! Crazy weather aside, we are taking this month to focus on keeping our bodies in balance. While balance is one of our key focal points for a balanced approach to health and wellness, it can be easily overlooked. I want to take some time to discuss why balance is important, and how we can improve our balance. The importance of balance training is paramount.  Two types of balance are essential for achieving functional balance: static and dynamic balance. Static balance refers to the ability to maintain your body in a set position, while dynamic balance describes the ability to remain in control of the body during changing circumstances, utilizing movements to maintain a base of support. Picture static balance as simply standing on one foot, while dynamic balance is surfing on a surf board. Both require proprioception, the ability to know where your body is in space, and strength. Focusing on improving proprioception and strength, particularly core strength, will improve your balance. This becomes increasingly important as we age, as falls due to lack of balance are a common cause of serious injury.

Proprioception Training

Proprioception requires the integration of input from our visual, sensory, and vestibular systems. Working on agility and coordination are great ways to improve your proprioceptive abilities. I encourage you to try a new class that pushes you slightly outside your comfort zone to do this. Great options for improving proprioception are Step and Core or Cardio Kick Boxing. The choreography and movements are fun and challenge your proprioception constantly. Secondly, and just as important is developing strength. As I have stated before, a well-rounded training program includes at least 2-3 days of a full-body strength training routine. Personal training and Targeted training ensure you are receiving this full-body strength programming in a safe and effective way. Pilates and Yoga are also great ways to improve core strength, and will also challenge your balance in other ways. Note, that while Bosu trainers and unstable platforms can be incorporated into a routine, training on these surfaces does not have to be a key part of improving your balance.

I encourage you all to mix up your routine this month.

Challenge your body in new and unexpected ways. Your balance will improve and your future self will thank you!

Do you have enough balance in your life? From cardio to strength to flexibility, nutrition, and everything in between – we’ve got you covered at 50/50. Come on in and speak to a specialist, to get your health and wellness back on track!

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How does cardio affect your body?

How does cardio affect your body?

Written by Personal Training Director, Jay McWilliams

Step and Core Cardio Class on Mondays

Cardio month continues at 50/50 Fitness Nutrition, and I thought this would be a good time to get down to the nitty gritty of how cardiovascular exercise changes our bodies on a physiological level. I promise, it is actually really cool! We throw around the term cardio all the time: “spinning is great cardio!”, but what does this type of exercise actually do to are cardiovascular system, namely our heart and blood vessels? As we are all well aware, when we exercise our heart rate increases. The body is pumping more blood to our hard-working muscles, and this results in a greater volume of blood returning to our heart per minute. Over time, our heart adapts by enlarging the left ventricle to more efficiently pump this larger volume of blood back to our tissues. These adaptations make our heart more efficient, both while exercising and at rest. One of the results of these changes is a lower resting heart rate. Athletes can have resting heart rates 20-40 beats per minute slower than the average person.

Another cool adaptation of the cardiovascular system to exercise is the creation of new blood vessels. Yes, your body, in some cases, can develop new blood vessels in response to your fitness habits. This is one reason your blood pressure can be reduced by exercise. Along with these changes to your heart and blood vessels, your lungs respond by delivering up to 15 times more oxygen to your tissues during exercise. Just like your heart, over time your respiratory tract adapts to become more efficient. One measure of the efficiency of your lungs is VO2 max. As your fitness level increases, so will your VO2 max. This week, while you are rocking it out in spin class, hiking with your dog up a local mountain, or busting your butt in Tabata, I want you to take a moment to think about all these changes going on in your body. Doing cardio is so much more than burning calories, you are becoming a more efficient pumper of blood and breather of air. Way to go!

Do you have enough balance in your life? From cardio to strength to flexibility, nutrition, and everything in between – we’ve got you covered at 50/50. Come on in and speak to a specialist, to get your health and wellness back on track!  Click the image below to schedule your FREE health and wellness today!

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